Expository Writing Essay Models

Tips on Writing an Expository Essay

The purpose of the expository essay is to explain a topic in a logical and straightforward manner. Without bells and whistles, expository essays present a fair and balanced analysis of a subject based on facts—with no references to the writer’s opinions or emotions.

A typical expository writing prompt will use the words “explain” or “define,” such as in, “Write an essay explaining how the computer has changed the lives of students.” Notice there is no instruction to form an opinion or argument on whether or not computers have changed students’ lives. The prompt asks the writer to “explain,” plain and simple. However, that doesn’t mean expository essay writing is easy.

The Five-Step Writing Process for Expository Essays
Expository writing is a life skill. More than any other type of writing, expository writing is a daily requirement of most careers. Understanding and following the proven steps of the writing process helps all writers, including students, master the expository essay.

Expository Essay Structure
Usually, the expository essay is composed of five paragraphs. The introductory paragraph contains the thesis or main idea. The next three paragraphs, or body of the essay, provide details in support of the thesis. The concluding paragraph restates the main idea and ties together the major points of essay.

Here are expository essay tips for each part of the essay structure and writing process:

1. Prewriting for the Expository Essay
In the prewriting phase of writing an expository essay, students should take time to brainstorm about the topic and main idea. Next, do research and take notes. Create an outline showing the information to be presented in each paragraph, organized in a logical sequence.

2. Drafting the Expository Essay
When creating the initial draft of an expository essay, consider the following suggestions:

  • The most important sentence in the introductory paragraph is the topic sentence, which states the thesis or main idea of the essay. The thesis should be clearly stated without giving an opinion or taking a position. A good thesis is well defined, with a manageable scope that can be adequately addressed within a five-paragraph essay.
  • Each of the three body paragraphs should cover a separate point that develops the essay’s thesis. The sentences of each paragraph should offer facts and examples in support of the paragraph’s topic.
  • The concluding paragraph should reinforce the thesis and the main supporting ideas. Do not introduce new material in the conclusion.
  • Since an expository essay discusses an event, situation, or the views of others, and not a personal experience, students should write in the third person (“he,” “she,” or “it”), and avoid “I” or “you” sentences.

3. Revising the Expository Essay
In the revision phase, students review, modify, and reorganize their work with the goal of making it the best it can be. Keep these considerations in mind:

  • Does the essay give an unbiased analysis that unfolds logically, using relevant facts and examples?
  • Has the information been clearly and effectively communicated to the reader?
  • Watch out for “paragraph sprawl,” which occurs when the writer loses focus and veers from the topic by introducing unnecessary details.
  • Is the sentence structure varied? Is the word choice precise?
  • Do the transitions between sentences and paragraphs help the reader’s understanding?
  • Does the concluding paragraph communicate the value and meaning of the thesis and key supporting ideas?

If the essay is still missing the mark, take another look at the topic sentence. A solid thesis statement leads to a solid essay. Once the thesis works, the rest of the essay falls into place more easily.

4. Editing the Expository Essay
Next, proofread and correct errors in grammar and mechanics, and edit to improve style and clarity. While an expository essay should be clear and concise, it can also be lively and engaging. Having a friend read the essay helps writers edit with a fresh perspective.

5. Publishing the Expository Essay
Sharing an expository essay with a teacher, parent, or other reader can be both exciting and intimidating. Remember, there isn’t a writer on earth who isn’t sensitive about his or her own work. The important thing is to learn from the experience and use the feedback to make the next essay better.

Essay Variations
Essay writing is a huge part of a education today. Most students must learn to write various kinds of essays during their academic careers, including different types of expository essay writing:

  • Definition essays explain the meaning of a word, term, or concept. The topic can be a concrete subject such as an animal or tree, or it can be an abstract term, such as freedom or love. This type of essay should discuss the word’s denotation (literal or dictionary definition), as well as its connotation or the associations that a word usually brings to mind.
  • Classification essays break down a broad subject or idea into categories and groups. The writer organizes the essay by starting with the most general category and then defines and gives examples of each specific classification.
  • Compare and contrast essays describe the similarities and differences between two or more people, places, or things. Comparison tells how things are alike and contrast shows how they are different.
  • Cause and effect essays explain how things affect each other and depend on each other. The writer identifies a clear relationship between two subjects, focusing on why things happen (causes) and/or what happens as a result (effects).
  • “How to” essays, sometimes called process essays, explain a procedure, step-by-step process, or how to do something with the goal of instructing the reader.

 

Time4Writing Teaches Expository Essay Writing
Time4Writing essay writing courses offer a highly effective way to learn how to write the types of essays required for school, standardized tests, and college applications. A unique online writing program for elementary, middle school, and high school students, Time4Writing breaks down the writing process into manageable chunks, easily digested by young writers. Students steadily build writing skills and confidence, guided by one-on-one instruction with a dedicated, certified teacher. Our middle school Welcome to the Essay and Advanced Essay courses teach students the fundamentals of writing essays, including the expository essay. The high school Exciting Essay Writing course focuses in depth on the essay writing process with preparation for college as the goal. The courses also cover how to interpret essay writing prompts in testing situations. Read what parents are saying about their children’s writing progress in Time4Writing courses.


Current Trends and Issues that Affect Today’s Aged Population

In a world where everything seems to be achieved by the youthful and vigorous, ageing has become a challenge. Late adulthood, old age, and eventual death are inevitable for everyone, yet the subject, irrespective of its inescapability, can be found difficult to discuss or understand. This discussion makes an attempt to view these three life events or milestones, to show how one’s circumstances and attitudes can affect the ways in which they are handled by the family and society.

In her book Development Through the Lifespan, Laura E Berk (2009) demonstrates through case histories, interviews and anecdotes that although growing old occurs everywhere to everyone, they are not handled in the same way by all. There are marked cultural, societal and personal differences in the ways different adults, the two genders, and families treat ageing. The biological and psychological changes that accompany the onset of late adulthood, which include forgetfulness, fatigue, detachment, and helplessness as well as the pain and discomfort of rheumatism, cardiac and respiratory conditions, all contribute to issues that confront people (Berk 608). Acceptance of change, especially when it seems sudden and irrefutable, is seen to be extremely difficult by some, and yet others handle the same conditions with agreeableness and resistance. The reasons for this difference in the ability for some to accept changes in themselves or in their relatives better than others are not always clear (Berk 610).

One negative life change in ageing women is loss of self-esteem when they are no longer able to care for loved ones because of failing health. When men retire, they feel a sense of loss of identity if they associate character with occupation (Berk 611). Psychological well-being in both men and women can be restored through social support. Society provides this through a number of organizations, associations, religious groups and cultural establishments. It is found, however, that for social support to provide well-being for elders, it needs to be accompanied by a sense of control. Sometimes, Berk asserts, a trade-off can be made between life aspects older people can control and those they cannot, in order to feel in charge of their own lives. For example, stamina can be reserved for enjoyable occupations such as dancing or bowling by leaving shopping and housework to helpers and carers.

The sense of one’s mortality is not as remote in old age as before, and as one’s friends begin to pass away, approaching death can depress or alarm some old people. Although it is easy to agree with the author of this book when she states that death is necessary in the life of any species to ensure its survival, humans do not always find it easy to accept. Death, dying and bereavement are strong life milestones sustained by cultural attitudes, outlooks and customs. Modern society seems to be more distanced from the reality of death than earlier generations, simply because people no longer die at home as often they used to (Berk 642). In addition, when people are depressed or in pain, they are more likely to suffer from death anxiety, which can be accompanied by reluctance to discuss it with others, which could bring about relief of the condition.

When a loved one passes away, older people are likely to be worse affected than others, because their own mortality and transience is emphasized by the event. Their grief is made more personal by becoming a presage of what is inevitable. In some cultures and religions, what Berk terms ‘symbolic immortality’ that comes from belief in an everlasting soul, helps older people to regard life as worthwhile and enjoy their ability to pass on wisdom and skills to the next generation, even if their life is necessarily finite. This sense of worth avoids anxiety about death becoming extreme or debilitating (Berk 643).

Coping with ageing, approaching death, dying and bereavement are not easy for anyone, but for the elderly, they can seem a defeating part of life. To avoid this becoming problematic or pathological, a feeling of self- and societal-worth must be emphasized in the lives of all elderly people. In this way, they can approach the twilight of their lives with optimism, grace and dignity.

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