Strong Transition Words For Persuasive Essays Topics

We should probably start by asking ourselves what are transition words and what value do they add to an essay? You need to connect ideas in your essay to improve readability. If your points are isolated and unrelated, then reading becomes difficult and boring.

As a matter of fact, most software that check for readability of texts look for correct usage of transition words. Some people recommend that you can add transition words when you are revising the paper. However, you have to get a good flow from the beginning. This means that you should be adding these words as you write. Transition words are very many. Using them might be confusing and that is where this article breaks them down into 4 major types depending on how and where you can use them.Also,if you can't do it yourself, we can help with college essays.

Sequential

These are the kind of words that you will want to use when writing about a list of points in prose. The words in this category are:       

  • Firstly, secondly, thirdly        
  • To begin with, initially, to start with, finally
  • Subsequently, afterwards, previously

The list is by no means endless. However, what you should know about words in this category is that they help you in introducing sentences of paragraphs that follow a sequence in prose. Using lists or numbers in an essay might be inappropriate and appear untidy. However, you might need to introduce related points and demonstrate that they are related. For instance, you want to write down three factors that lead to global warming. You might use "to begin with" for the first point, "secondly" for the second point, and "finally" for the third point. This will not only make it easy to read, but show the reader that the points are related. 

Casual

Casual transition words show the relationship between sentences and paragraphs, where the proceeding point emerges as a cause or effect of the previous. Some words in this category are:

  • Consequently, as a result, due to the fact that
  • Therefore, thus, otherwise
  • For, since, unless

You can easily identify casual transition words by looking at the relationship they create between two sentences or paragraphs. For instance, you can have two independent sentences like: I was later for school. I was punished by the head teacher. You can improve readability by showing that the second action was as a result of the first. Your sentence can look something like this: "Due to the fact that I was late for school, I was punished by the head teacher. When using casual transitions, you should always be keen on establishing the nature of relationship between sentences and paragraphs.

Additive

These are the kind of transitions you use when you want to show that the current point is an addition to the previous. You should not confuse additive with sequential. In the case of additive, the current point is only directly related to the previous. However, in case of sequential there is a relationship between all the points mentioned in the sequence. Examples of additive transitions are:

  • In addition to, furthermore, similarly, likewise
  • In other words, to illustrate, for instance

You can use these words to explain in detail the previous point. They can be used to avoid run on sentences where the reader is forced to read a long sentence without a pause. For instance, let us consider the following sentences:

  1. Technology has made life easier through the introduction of gadgets such as smart phones and technology has also promoted peace
  2. Technology has made life easier through the introduction of gadgets such as smartphone. Furthermore, it has also promoted peace.

The first sentence is a perfect example of a run on sentence. The readability is poor and it could be confusing. However, you can create a relationship between the two ideas by introducing an additive transition. This makes it easy for the reader to notice the connection.

Adversative

These transitions accomplish the task opposite to additive transitions. Instead of adding, they show conflict between ideas. Examples in this category are:

  • Regardless, nonetheless, however
  • Otherwise, regardless, on the other hand

The words in this category are mostly used when writing an analysis or argumentative essay. This is because you will mostly find that explaining opposing views will provide a better analysis or argument. You can also use these transitions to provide alternative, not necessarily opposing, views. The list of transition words is long because there are many examples. You will hear most students asking for examples of transition words. However, it is important to understand the different types and how they are used first. Once you are conversant with the types, you will only need to look at an example within a sentence to be able to use the same in an essay. When it comes to transition words, you will definitely need to improve on your reading habits. With time they will sink in and you will find using them easy.

Persuasive essays are those in which you must convince a reader that your position on an issue is the correct one. Thus, you may want to convince an audience that animal testing is immoral or that genetically modified foods are harmful. Perhaps you want to convince someone that the proposed Canadian pipeline or fracking poses dangers to our environment; maybe you believe that there is too much money spent on political campaigns. Whatever your topic and whatever your position, you must organize an essay that flows logically from one point to the next.

Good Transitions = Logical Flow

You may have done great research and you may have great arguments in favor of our position. If they are not presented well, though, your essay will fall flat and your reader will not be convinced.

Part of a good presentation means than you understand how to use transition words for persuasive essays. So, let’s first look at what a transition is and then take a look at good transition words and phrases for essays.

Definition of Transitions: These are words or phrases that connect one thought or idea to the next. They can be used to connect thoughts in two sentences or to move the reader on to the next paragraph in a logical way. They can be single words, phrases, or complete sentences. Typical examples might include the following:

  1. Words: Clearly, Definitely, Obviously, Furthermore, However, Notwithstanding, First (Second, etc.)
  2. Phrases: Without question, What is more, In reality, In fact, Yet another, For example (instance), In other words, According to,
  3. Sentences: These usually occur at the end of a paragraph as you are trying to move your reader into the point that will be covered in the next paragraph. For example, if you are writing a persuasive essay about money in politics, and you have just completed a paragraph on the Supreme Court “Citizens United” decision, you might end that paragraph with something like, “This decision has impacted campaign and elections in many ways.” Now, your reader is prepared for what is to come next – the ways in which that decision has affected campaigns/elections.

Now, your next paragraph in such an essay will speak to one impact that the decision has had – perhaps the establishment of PAC’s into which donors can throw a much money as they wish. At the end of that paragraph, you will want to transition into the next point you will be making, so your transition sentence might read something like, “And once a campaign has been successful because of all of the donated money, the elected official will have certain obligations to those who have provided that campaign funding.” This sentence contains great a lead in to the next paragraph which will discuss how an elected official is then obligate to vote and make decisions based upon the desires of those who provided the funding.

Whether you are using persuasive essay transition wordsbetween sentences or entire phrases or sentences between paragraphs, your transitions connect your arguments and allow the reader to see where you are going next. If you don’t use these transitions, the reader cannot follow your argument!

Primary Uses for Transition Words and Phrases of Essaysthat Attempt to Persuade

You have to think about the flow of your essay and what you are trying to do with your use of transitional words, phrases and sentences. Basically, the purposes of your transitions are any one of the following:

  1. Adding to a Point You Have Made: You will use such words/phrases as: Furthermore, What is more, In addition to, Likewise, Moreover
  2. Providing Examples: Use such phrases as, for instance, for example, in other words
  3. Providing Lists: Use any of the following: First, second, third (etc.), yet another, the following.
  4. Same Point Stated in a Different Way: Good phrases include, in other words, with this in mind, another way to look at this, etc.

Transitions Can Be Tricky

You know that you need to use transitional words correctly, especially when you are trying to make points that will persuade someone to accept your point of view. Without them, your essay loses clarity and logic. If you are having trouble with transitions, you can get great help at http://www.grabmyessay.com/write-my-essay. These pros can either write your persuasive essay in its entirety or provide a review and edit, adding the words, phrases, and/or sentences that should be included in order to achieve your persuasive purose.

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