109th Congress Committee Assignments

109th Congress (2005–2007)

Congressional Profile

Total Membership:

  • 435 Representatives
  • 4 Delegates
  • 1 Resident Commissioner

Party Divisions:*

  • 201 Democrats
  • 233 Republicans
  • 1 Independent

*Party division totals are based on election day results.

Congress Overview

The 2004 elections increased the House Republican majority, kept the Senate closely divided, and re-elected President George W. Bush. The 109th Congress (2005–2007) responded to the devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast. Congress also reorganized the National Institutes of Health, helped low-income individuals with HIV/AIDS, extended tax reductions, and restructured the United States Postal Service for the first time in a generation.

Historical Highlights

See more Historical Highlights.

Leadership & Officers

Speaker of the House:
J. Dennis Hastert (R–Illinois)
Majority Leader:
John Boehner (R–Ohio) 1
Roy Blunt (R–Missouri) 2
Tom Delay (R–Texas) 3
Minority Leader:
Nancy Pelosi (D–California)
Democratic Whip:
Steny Hoyer (D–Maryland)
Republican Whip:
Roy Blunt (R–Missouri)
Democratic Caucus Chairman:
Bob Menendez (D–New Jersey)
Republican Conference Chairman:
Deborah Pryce (R–Ohio)
Clerk of the House:
Jeff Trandahl 4
Karen L. Haas 5
Chief Administrative Officer:
James M. Eagen, III
Sergeant at Arms:
Wilson (Bill) Livingood
Chaplain of the House:
Daniel P. Coughlin – Roman Catholic
Parliamentarian:
John V. Sullivan

To view complete lists of individuals who have served in these leadership and official positions since the 1st Congress, visit the People section

Discharge Petitions

NumberDatePetition to Discharge
No. 0001May 18, 2005 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 267)
No. 0002May 24, 2005 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 270)
No. 0003November 16, 2005 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 271)
No. 0004December 6, 2005 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 460)
No. 0005December 5, 2005 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 537)
No. 0006December 6, 2005 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 543)
No. 0007December 14, 2005 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 568)
No. 0008December 14, 2005 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 570)
No. 0009December 16, 2005 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 584)
No. 0010December 16, 2005 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 585)
No. 0011February 28, 2006 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 614)
No. 0012April 26, 2006 the Committees on Ways and Means, Energy and Commerce and Education and the Workforce from the consideration of the bill
(H.R. 4263)
No. 0013May 23, 2006 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 814)
No. 0014July 27, 2006 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 917)
No. 0015September 20, 2006 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 987)
No. 0016September 25, 2006 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 998)
No. 0017September 27, 2006 the Committee on Rules from the consideration of the resolution
(H. Res. 1007)
No. 0018September 28, 2006 the Committee on Education and the Workforce, Energy and Commerce from the consideration of the bill
(H.R. 1402)

The One Hundred Ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, from January 3, 2005 to January 3, 2007, during the fifth and sixth years of George W. Bush's presidency. House members were elected in the 2004 elections on November 2, 2004. Senators were elected in three classes in the 2000 elections on November 7, 2000, 2002 elections on November 5, 2002, or 2004 elections on November 2, 2004. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twenty-second Census of the United States in 2000. Both chambers had a Republican majority, the same party as President Bush.

Major events[edit]

Main articles: 2005 in the United States, 2006 in the United States, and 2007 in the United States

  • November 7, 2006 — California Representative Nancy Pelosi and Nevada Senator Harry Reid lead the Democratic Party in taking control of both the House and the Senate in the 2006 congressional elections, the first time in 12 years the Democrats secure control of both houses of Congress simultaneously.
  • Prominent events included the filibuster "nuclear option" scare, the failure of the federal government to promptly respond to Hurricane Katrina disaster relief, the Tom DeLay corruption investigation, Plamegate, the rising unpopularity of the Iraq War, the 2006 immigration reform protests and government involvement in the Terri Schiavo case.
  • In addition to the DeLay indictment, this Congress also had a number of scandals: Bob Ney, Randy "Duke" Cunningham, William J. Jefferson, Mark Foley scandal, and the Jack Abramoff scandals.
  • This Congress met for 242 days, the fewest since World War II and 12 days fewer than the 80th Congress.[1][2][3] As the Congress neared its conclusion, some media commentators labelled this the "Do Nothing Congress," [1][4][5][6][7] a pejorative originally given to the 80th United States Congress by President Harry Truman, although the number of bills passed by Congress is no measure of its success.
  • The President vetoed only one bill, his first veto, the Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act of 2005.

Major legislation[edit]

Enacted[edit]

Main article: List of Acts of the 109th United States Congress

  • February 17, 2005: Class Action Fairness Act of 2005, Pub.L. 109–2
  • March 21, 2005: Theresa Marie Schiavo's law, Pub.L. 109–3
  • April 20, 2005: Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act, Pub.L. 109–8
  • April 27, 2005: Family Entertainment and Copyright Act, Pub.L. 109–9
  • July 28, 2005: Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (CAFTA Implementation Act), Pub.L. 109–53
  • July 29, 2005: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Pub.L. 109–58
  • August 10, 2005: Transportation Equity Act of 2005, Pub.L. 109–59
  • October 26, 2005: Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, Pub.L. 109–92
  • December 1, 2005: Caribbean National Forest Act of 2005, Pub.L. 109–118
  • December 22, 2005: Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005, Pub.L. 109–145
  • December 30, 2005: Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2006, Pub.L. 109–148
  • February 8, 2006: Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, Pub.L. 109–171
  • May 17, 2006: Tax Increase Prevention and Reconciliation Act of 2005, Pub.L. 109–222
  • May 29, 2006: Respect for America's Fallen Heroes Act, Pub.L. 109–228
  • July 27, 2006: Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act, Pub.L. 109–248
  • September 26, 2006: Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006, Pub.L. 109–282
  • October 13, 2006: Safe Port Act, Pub.L. 109–347, including title VIII, Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006
  • October 17, 2006: Military Commissions Act of 2006, Pub.L. 109–366
  • October 26, 2006: Secure Fence Act of 2006, Pub.L. 109–367
  • December 20, 2006: Stolen Valor Act of 2005, Pub.L. 109–437
  • December 20, 2006: Tax Relief and Health Act of 2006, Pub.L. 109–432

Proposed, but not enacted[edit]

More information: Complete index of Public and Private Laws for 109th Congress at U.S. Government Printing Office

Hearings[edit]

See also: Congressional hearing

Party summary[edit]

Senate[edit]

The party summary for the Senate remained the same during the entire 109th Congress. On January 16, 2006, Democrat Jon Corzine resigned, but Democrat Bob Menendez was appointed and took Corzine's seat the next day.

House of Representatives[edit]

Due to resignations and special elections, Republicans lost a net of three seats; Democrats gained one seat; three seats were left vacant; and one seat which was vacant at the beginning of the Congress was filled. All seats were filled though special elections. (See Changes in membership, below.)

AffiliationParty
(Shading shows control)
Total
DemocraticIndependentRepublicanVacant
End of previous Congress20712254332
Begin20112324341
March 10, 20052024350
April 29, 20052314341
August 2, 20052304332
September 6, 20052314341
December 1, 20052304332
December 7, 20052314341
January 16, 20062014332
June 9, 20062304323
June 13, 20062314332
September 29, 20062304323
November 3, 20062294314
November 13, 20062022304332
December 31, 20062294323
Final voting share47.0%53.0%
Non-voting members41050
Beginning of next Congress23302024350

Leadership[edit]

Section contents:Senate: Majority (R), Minority (D) • House: Majority (R), Minority (D)

Senate[edit]

Majority (Republican) leadership[edit]

Minority (Democratic) leadership[edit]

House of Representatives[edit]

Majority (Republican) leadership[edit]

  • Majority Leader: Tom DeLay, until September 28, 2005
  • Majority Whip: Roy Blunt
  • Senior Chief Deputy Whip: Eric Cantor
  • Deputy Whip Team: Kevin Brady
  • Assistant Deputy Whip Team: Doc Hastings
  • Conference Chair: Deborah Pryce
  • Conference Vice-Chair: Jack Kingston
  • Conference Secretary: John T. Doolittle
  • Policy Committee Chairman: John Shadegg, until February 2, 2006
  • Campaign Committee Chairman: Tom Reynolds

Minority (Democratic) leadership[edit]

  • Minority Leader: Nancy Pelosi
  • Minority Whip: Steny Hoyer
  • Senior Chief Deputy Whip: John Lewis
  • Minority Deputy Whip Team: Joe Crowley, Diana DeGette, Ron Kind, Ed Pastor, Jan Schakowsky, John Tanner & Maxine Waters
  • Democratic Caucus Chairman: Bob Menendez, until January 16, 2006
  • Democratic Caucus Vice Chairman: Jim Clyburn, until January 16, 2006
  • Assistant to the House Minority Leader: John Spratt
  • Democratic Campaign Committee Chairman: Rahm Emanuel
  • Democratic Steering Committee Co-Chairs: Rosa DeLauro, George Miller

Members[edit]

Senate[edit]

In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term ended with this Congress, requiring reelection in 2006; Class 2 meant their term began in the last Congress, requiring reelection in 2008; and Class 3 meant their term began in this Congress, requiring reelection in 2010.

See also: United States Senate elections, 2004

Party standings in the Senate during the 109th Congress

  44 Democratic Senators

  1 Independent Senator, caucusing with Democrats

  55 Republican Senators

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