Essay On The Journey Of The Magi

Journey Of The Magi Essay


T.S. Eliot’s Journey of the Magi

This Christmas poem is about the Epiphany and was created the very year of Eliot’s conversion to Christianity (Fleisner, 66). Therefore the theme of religion is an important one if we are to analyse the poem correctly. In the book of Ephesians in the Bible, Paul describes the rebirth of the world upon Christ’s death, emphasising the Ephesians’ new life (2:4-5). This theme of death and rebirth is present in the poem Journey of the Magi, which, I will argue, is structurally and internally divided into three stages; corresponding to the Sacrament of Penance: contrition (guilt), confession and satisfaction.

To understand this poem, one has to understand the impact that Christ had on the World. At the time of his birth, however, the known world was not stable; people worshipped many gods, and we get a full description of the way life was by the Magus who narrates his story of their journey to Bethlehem to witness the end of an era and the birth of a new one.

According to the Oxford Dictionary of the Bible, "contrition is a penitent’s spiritual sorrow for the sins he has committed, and it necessarily includes hatred for such sins, as well as the determination to avoid them in the future." In the first stanza, this "spiritual sorrow" is apparent by the contrast Eliot uses, of the Magi’s difficult journey. In fact, the central focus of criticism has been on the journey; the "cold coming" (line 1) during "the worst time of the year" (line 2), emphasising the climatic statement of the stanza: "A hard time we had of it" (line 16). The Magus talks of their sorrowful past life of ease, the times they "regretted…the silken girls bringing sherbet" (lines 8-10), and in the same way that they are ‘physically’ moving towards Christ, they feel they are progressing spiritually, putting a personal ban on the sinful lives they have had. This act of contrition seems genuine because they are pressured by the "voices singing in [their] ears, saying/ That this was all folly" (lines 19-20). These are the voices of the camel men, the hostile cities and the unfriendly towns, voices that tempt the wise men to cease their foolish journey and fall, once again, into spiritual degeneration. In the end, the difficulty of the journey comes to remind the Magi of their previous life and thus urges them forward.

	The second stanza moves into the third stage in the Sacrament: satisfaction, which is the obligatory penance that follows the confession of sins. In keeping with the first stanza which elaborates the difficulties of the journey, Eliot does not depict the primary aspect of satisfaction (the fulfilment of penance) in stanza two, but rather the secondary aspect, which, according to the Oxford Bible Dictionary is a "medicinal purpose…[assisting] the penitent to resist relapse into the same kind of...

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T.S. Eliot beautifully tells the story of Jesus’s birth through the eyes of a magus who traveled to Bethlehem in “Journey of the Magi.” “Journey of the Magi” was published in 1927 and was a part of a series of Eliot's poems called Ariel Poems. “Religious themes became increasingly important in his poetry” after Eliot converted to Anglicanism.
The title, “Journey of the Magi,” clearly communicates to the reader of what they can anticipate to read. Magi is the plural form of magus meaning “a member of a priestly caste of ancient Persia.” Commonly, people call the three men who visited Jesus wise men and kings. T.S. Eliot does not use the word magi or other similar words. The readers do know, Eliot writes from one of the magi’s point of views as in line forty, “We returned to our places, these Kingdoms,” tells the reader the narrator is a king.
T.S. Eliot uses free verse to write “Journey of the Magi” as it uses no rime or meter. The form is dramatic monologue as the narrator, the magus, is speaking to the listener about his journey. The narrator found the journey hard, but kept persevering until he reached his goal of seeing “a Birth.” Eliot communicates that the magi are strong and determined men as they withstand the journey’s hardships.
“Journey of the Magi” begins with a quote based off of Lancelot Andrewes’s “Nativity Sermon.” The reader can feel the chills of the cold and long journey the magi must endure. The reader is immediately thrust into the middle of the journey rather than starting at the beginning. The narrator uses “we” as he talks about himself and his fellow magi. Their journey has brought regrets as the men think of their summer palaces and girls bringing them sherbet. The regrets have even spread to their “camel men” who run away. Not only is the weather making the magi’s journey difficult, but the villages, towns, and cities are hostile, unfriendly, dirty, and expensive. The magi journey all night and sleep whenever they can. The end of the first stanza ends with: “With the voices singing in our ears, saying / That this was all folly.” It is assumed the voices are indeed the magi’s dark thoughts. It adds a different layer of the struggle the magi face. Internal thoughts can be harder to deal with than cold weather or rude people. The voices are discouraging to the magi, but despite this the magi continue on, showing their strength.
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